Snakebite Envenomation: A Global Health Crisis.
Snakebite Envenomation: A Global Health Crisis.

With the Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting.

 With vast jungles home to numerous venomous species, Congo is at the forefront of a neglected health crisis for Africa. Here, Patrick Atelo displays a Mamba caught near his village, Equateur Province.

With vast jungles home to numerous venomous species, Congo is at the forefront of a neglected health crisis for Africa. Here, Patrick Atelo displays a Mamba caught near his village, Equateur Province.

 Alphonsi and Guylain move their pirogue (canoe) through thick marsh to check their nets for fish on the Congo River near Kinshasa. Activity such as this on marshy shores brings a high potential for contact with venomous snakes.  

Alphonsi and Guylain move their pirogue (canoe) through thick marsh to check their nets for fish on the Congo River near Kinshasa. Activity such as this on marshy shores brings a high potential for contact with venomous snakes.  

 African Puff Adder. This species causes a large percentage of snakebites throughout Africa. Venom causes haemorrhage, vomiting and tissue necrosis. 

African Puff Adder. This species causes a large percentage of snakebites throughout Africa. Venom causes haemorrhage, vomiting and tissue necrosis. 

 Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.  

Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.  

 Western Black Tree Snake. Non-venomous but can be easily mistaken for a Black Mamba (a species not present in DR Congo) so is feared as such. 

Western Black Tree Snake. Non-venomous but can be easily mistaken for a Black Mamba (a species not present in DR Congo) so is feared as such. 

 Monique Dongo, a victim of snakebite when she was inspecting her land on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. She lost consciousness in the bush, far from any health clinics. Luckily, she made a full recovery. 

Monique Dongo, a victim of snakebite when she was inspecting her land on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. She lost consciousness in the bush, far from any health clinics. Luckily, she made a full recovery. 

 Dr. Anuarite Nyaboleka at the Tabe medical clinic in Mbandaka, Equateur Province. The doctor has no access to anti-venoms and is left providing symptomatic care for envenomations.

Dr. Anuarite Nyaboleka at the Tabe medical clinic in Mbandaka, Equateur Province. The doctor has no access to anti-venoms and is left providing symptomatic care for envenomations.

 Francois Nsingi, a technician at the Kinshasa Centre of Anti-Venom, a massively underfunded body. Anti-venom is scarce in Congo, unavailable to the majority of the population.

Francois Nsingi, a technician at the Kinshasa Centre of Anti-Venom, a massively underfunded body. Anti-venom is scarce in Congo, unavailable to the majority of the population.

 Forest Cobra. Neurotoxic venom that causes shock, fever, dizziness, pain, paralysis and respiratory symptoms.

Forest Cobra. Neurotoxic venom that causes shock, fever, dizziness, pain, paralysis and respiratory symptoms.

 Boiga Mangrove Snake. Little is known about it’s venom.

Boiga Mangrove Snake. Little is known about it’s venom.

 Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.

Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.

 Jose Lisisa, 10, clears foliage around his village on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. Working amidst undergrowth creates a snakebite risk as well-camouflaged vipers and cobras can be disturbed and strike.

Jose Lisisa, 10, clears foliage around his village on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. Working amidst undergrowth creates a snakebite risk as well-camouflaged vipers and cobras can be disturbed and strike.

 Fishing is one of the principal activities that brings humans into contact with snakes. Here, a group of fishermen led by Henry Bokuta prepare to haul their nets back into their pirogues, Congo River, Kinshasa.

Fishing is one of the principal activities that brings humans into contact with snakes. Here, a group of fishermen led by Henry Bokuta prepare to haul their nets back into their pirogues, Congo River, Kinshasa.

 A boy sells his catch of the day mid-stream of the Congo River, Equateur Province. Venomous species of snakes pose a risk of bites when caught in nets or hunting along river banks. 

A boy sells his catch of the day mid-stream of the Congo River, Equateur Province. Venomous species of snakes pose a risk of bites when caught in nets or hunting along river banks. 

Snakebite Envenomation: A Global Health Crisis.
 With vast jungles home to numerous venomous species, Congo is at the forefront of a neglected health crisis for Africa. Here, Patrick Atelo displays a Mamba caught near his village, Equateur Province.
 Alphonsi and Guylain move their pirogue (canoe) through thick marsh to check their nets for fish on the Congo River near Kinshasa. Activity such as this on marshy shores brings a high potential for contact with venomous snakes.  
 African Puff Adder. This species causes a large percentage of snakebites throughout Africa. Venom causes haemorrhage, vomiting and tissue necrosis. 
 Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.  
 Western Black Tree Snake. Non-venomous but can be easily mistaken for a Black Mamba (a species not present in DR Congo) so is feared as such. 
 Monique Dongo, a victim of snakebite when she was inspecting her land on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. She lost consciousness in the bush, far from any health clinics. Luckily, she made a full recovery. 
 Dr. Anuarite Nyaboleka at the Tabe medical clinic in Mbandaka, Equateur Province. The doctor has no access to anti-venoms and is left providing symptomatic care for envenomations.
 Francois Nsingi, a technician at the Kinshasa Centre of Anti-Venom, a massively underfunded body. Anti-venom is scarce in Congo, unavailable to the majority of the population.
 Forest Cobra. Neurotoxic venom that causes shock, fever, dizziness, pain, paralysis and respiratory symptoms.
 Boiga Mangrove Snake. Little is known about it’s venom.
 Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.
 Jose Lisisa, 10, clears foliage around his village on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. Working amidst undergrowth creates a snakebite risk as well-camouflaged vipers and cobras can be disturbed and strike.
 Fishing is one of the principal activities that brings humans into contact with snakes. Here, a group of fishermen led by Henry Bokuta prepare to haul their nets back into their pirogues, Congo River, Kinshasa.
 A boy sells his catch of the day mid-stream of the Congo River, Equateur Province. Venomous species of snakes pose a risk of bites when caught in nets or hunting along river banks. 
Snakebite Envenomation: A Global Health Crisis.

With the Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting.

With vast jungles home to numerous venomous species, Congo is at the forefront of a neglected health crisis for Africa. Here, Patrick Atelo displays a Mamba caught near his village, Equateur Province.

Alphonsi and Guylain move their pirogue (canoe) through thick marsh to check their nets for fish on the Congo River near Kinshasa. Activity such as this on marshy shores brings a high potential for contact with venomous snakes.  

African Puff Adder. This species causes a large percentage of snakebites throughout Africa. Venom causes haemorrhage, vomiting and tissue necrosis. 

Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.  

Western Black Tree Snake. Non-venomous but can be easily mistaken for a Black Mamba (a species not present in DR Congo) so is feared as such. 

Monique Dongo, a victim of snakebite when she was inspecting her land on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. She lost consciousness in the bush, far from any health clinics. Luckily, she made a full recovery. 

Dr. Anuarite Nyaboleka at the Tabe medical clinic in Mbandaka, Equateur Province. The doctor has no access to anti-venoms and is left providing symptomatic care for envenomations.

Francois Nsingi, a technician at the Kinshasa Centre of Anti-Venom, a massively underfunded body. Anti-venom is scarce in Congo, unavailable to the majority of the population.

Forest Cobra. Neurotoxic venom that causes shock, fever, dizziness, pain, paralysis and respiratory symptoms.

Boiga Mangrove Snake. Little is known about it’s venom.

Atheris Bush Viper. Venom causes haemorrhage and pain, no specific anti-venom exists.

Jose Lisisa, 10, clears foliage around his village on the outskirts of Mbandaka, Equateur Province. Working amidst undergrowth creates a snakebite risk as well-camouflaged vipers and cobras can be disturbed and strike.

Fishing is one of the principal activities that brings humans into contact with snakes. Here, a group of fishermen led by Henry Bokuta prepare to haul their nets back into their pirogues, Congo River, Kinshasa.

A boy sells his catch of the day mid-stream of the Congo River, Equateur Province. Venomous species of snakes pose a risk of bites when caught in nets or hunting along river banks. 

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